Sunday, 30 January 2011

How do I remove bitumen from my parquet floor?

Following my article of 17th November I am still receiving enquiries about removing bitumen, particularly from wood parquet floors. Bitumen (or tar as it is sometimes known) is used as an adhesive to stick wood flooring, particularly parquet and similar types of wood flooring.

Over time the bitumen seeps up between the joints leaving black marks on the floor.I had this problem on my own floors.My wife and I decided to replace the carpet from the hall and stairs To make the job easier and cheaper I took up the existing carpet myself only to find a parquet floor underneath. I could also see the floor continued into the lounge. After much persuasion my wife agreed to not replacing the carpet on the understanding that I cleaned the floor and did all the maintenance!

The floor that was revealed was very dirty and appeared to have a lot of black marks, (which I subsequently found to be bitumen) between the wood tiles. After several attempts at sweeping the floor I managed to pick up all the dust. I then got down on my hands and knees (I could in those days!) and used Scotchbrite (a non scratch scourer) soaked in Heritage Woodcare and "scrubbed" the whole floor. I finished up with a floor that looked really clean and had a slight sheen, I was also pleased to note that all the bitumen that had seeped up between the joints had been removed Now every time I sweep the floor it also restores the sheen and wiping over with my Heritage Woodcare once per month is all that is required to keep my floor looking really good

.Heritage Woodcare is available online, visit http://www.heritagewoodcare.co.uk/buy-woodcare

Wednesday, 19 January 2011

In my last post I told you about Heritage Woodcare and having received some enquiries recently about removing bitumen from wood floors I will use this post to tell you how Heritage does it.

Bitumen or tar as it is sometimes known is often used as an adhesive to stick wood flooring, particularly parquet and similar types of wood flooring. Over time the bitumen seeps up between the joints leaving black marks on the floor.I had this problem on my own floors.

My wife and I decided to replace the carpet from the hall and stairs To make the job easier and cheaper I took up the existing carpet myself only to find a parquet floor underneath. I could also see the floor continued into the lounge. After much persuasion my wife agreed to not replacing the carpet on the understanding that I cleaned the floor and did all the maintenance!

The floor that was revealed was very dirty and appeared to have a lot of black marks, which I subsequently found to be bitumen, between the wood tiles. After several attempts at sweeping the floor I managed to pick up all the dust. I then got down on my hands and knees (I could in those days!) and used Scotchbrite (a non scratch scourer) soaked in Heritage Woodcare and "scrubbed" the whole floor. I finished up with a floor that looked really clean and had a slight sheen, I was also pleased to note that all the bitumen that had seeped up between the joints had been removedNow every time I sweep the floor it also restores the sheen and wiping over with my Heritage Woodcare once per month is all that is required to keep my floor looking really good.

Heritage Woodcare is available online, visit http://www.heritagewoodcare.co.uk/buy-woodcare

Sunday, 16 January 2011

How can I keep my my wood furniture and wood floors clean and polished with the minimum effort?

Recently I have had a number of queries about Heritage Woodcare (also known as Celtic Woodcare).

It is some time since my last post as I have been ill over the festive period so in this post I will tell you about Heritage Woodcare. Made in their Dublin facility by Drigate Products, Heritage Woodcare is a twentyfirst century polish based on a tried and tested recipe that is centuries old and was known only by the grand masters of the furniture crafts. The constant striving for perfection in the cleaning, polishing, and preservation of wooden furniture between these rival grandmasters can still be seen today when looking at many priceless antiques.In order, to get the desired results, these grandmasters would spend hours, sometimes days, working on a single item.

Few people today have the time, or the patience, of these grandmasters, so, after much research, and backed up by modern technology, this centuries old recipe has been updated to produce Heritage Woodcare. which gives the same outstanding results in a fraction of the time.

Heritage Woodcare is very easy to use. Take your bottle, give it a really good shake and pour some into a container. Take any soft, clean cloth, soak it in the polish, squeeze and wring your cloth out and then pour the polish remaining in your container back into your bottle. You are now ready!

To clean and polish your furniture you simply wipe, following the grain of the wood. Heritage Woodcare cleans and polishes at the same time, removing the build-up of silicons, waxes, grease and grime thus restoring your furniture back to its original finish. Please note, heavy build-ups of grease and grime may require more than one application. It will also remove most white heat marks, ring marks and water marks although again, more than one application may be needed.

There are many other uses for your Heritage Woodcare which I will tell you about in the next few posts.

You can buy Heritage Woodcare online, visit http://www.heritagewoodcare.co.uk/buy-woodcare

Wednesday, 5 January 2011

A Happy and Prosperous New Year to all my readers

May I take this opportunity to wish all my readers a happy and prosperous New Year.

I have been offline for some time over the Festive period owing to illness. Just before Christmas I managed to pick up the flu' bug that was going the rounds. This took its toll and laid me up for some time but I am now in the recovery phase and am back so look out for some exciting developments in the next few months.

Incidentally it is great to see the England Cricket Team doing so well don't you think. It is, however, tragic to see the extent of the floods and my heart goes out to those people affected.